The use of irony in portraying the paradox of war in war is kind a poem by stephen crane

Cleopatra by John William Waterhouse Mark Antony — one of the triumvirs of the Roman Republic, along with Octavius and Lepidus — has neglected his soldierly duties after being beguiled by Egypt's Queen, Cleopatra.

The use of irony in portraying the paradox of war in war is kind a poem by stephen crane

Stanzas one, three, and five present a maiden, a child, and a mother, respectively, who have all lost someone close to them through war.

Choose from different sets of term:stephen crane = war is kind flashcards on Quizlet. Log in Sign up. term:stephen crane = war is kind Flashcards. Browse sets of term:stephen crane = war is kind flashcards What is the verbal irony used in this? Stephen cranes poem. War. Young people. Stephen crane. Do not cry maiden for war is. is and in to a was not you i of it the be he his but for are this that by on at they with which she or from had we will have an what been one if would who has her. The poem is told by an individual telling a selection of people in mourning of the war not to be upset since "War is Kind". The poem also describes scenes of war that may be used to support the argument.

The descriptions of the losses are gut-wrenching. For example, in stanza one, Crane writes: Do not weep, maiden, for war is kind. Because your lover threw wild hands toward the skyAnd the The use of verbal irony in Stephen Crane 's "War is Kind" makes Crane's attitude toward war very clear.

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Because your lover threw wild hands toward the sky And the affrighted steed ran on alone, Do not weep. The image of the maiden's lover throwing "wild hands" upward while flailing helplessly and falling from his "affrighted steed" that "ran on alone" shatters the idea of glorious war and valiant death.

While dying, the lover did not charge ahead and boldly sacrifice himself to achieve a final glory; the steed did not return to pick up its brave master. Instead, we are presented with the reality of war, followed by the very ironic demand that the maiden "not weep" because "war is kind.

Stanza three presents a similar pattern, focusing on a small child who has lost a father. However, there is no mention of the father's brave final moments. Once again, Crane ends the stanza with the ironic "do not weep.

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In this poem, Crane does not glorify war. His poem makes it clear that war is cruel and unattractive.The use of verbal irony in Stephen Crane's "War is Kind" makes Crane's attitude toward war very clear. Stanzas one, three, and five present a maiden, a child, and a mother, respectively, who have.

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Both Stephen Crane's poem "War is Kind" and William Butler Yeat's "On Being Asked for a War Poem" have varied and different techniques and the two poems best illustrate to us the sub-theme of war: emotions aroused from war. The influence of Cranes "War is Kind" was from his compassion and empathy for the everyday suffering of war victims.1/5(1).

Stephen Crane’s style of writing is characterized by the widespread use of irony in his works. The poem “War is kind” is considered to be the brilliant example of the usage of it because of poem’s tone being rather bitter and sarcastic.

The use of irony in portraying the paradox of war in war is kind a poem by stephen crane

is and in to a was not you i of it the be he his but for are this that by on at they with which she or from had we will have an what been one if would who has her.

Irony in Stephen Crane’s War Is Kind Most poets use their unique gift of writing poetry to relieve stress or just to document their emotions towards a given subject/5(1).

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